Smell Text Messages with the oPhone

The oPhone Duo

The oPhone Duo

oSnap app screen shot

oSnap app screen shot

Have you ever had the desire to send your friend a scent via your smartphone? No? Me either. However that’s aside from the fact that now you actually can! Sending a scent is now possible with the all new oPhone. Harvard professor David Edwards and co-inventor Rachel Field have invented the first device that is capable of sending and receiving scents via an app on your phone. oNotes would be the equivalent of say text messages. The idea is to take a picture, tag it with oNotes and send it to a friend with an oPhone who can then smell your message. 

After going on their website I found that you could be the proud owner of an oPhone for just $149.00. I’m still trying to figure out if that’s a steal or a rip-off. The mobile app oSnap is already available for iPhone users to download which consists of a collection of scents and smells that users could send to one another. Apparently capturing a scent and sending it is still out of reach at the moment. For now users could use multiple oNotes to identify the smell of whatever they are tagging. Eventually oSnap wishes to boast a more comprehensive oMedia library filled with a broad range of scents.

Edwards believes that the future of mobile communication lies in attaching scents to our pictures and creating oFilms capable of capturing a range of aromas throughout a video. I’m not sure if this technology will be as revolutionary as Edwards believes it will be but at the very least, it brings a new sense to the world of mobile communication. I would love to hear from someone who owns one of these. If you own an oPhone and have used oSnap to send oNotes, please let us know what you think of the technology and if it is as innovative as its inventor’s make it seem. Thanks for stopping by!

NASA’s IRIS Captures Solar Eruption!

 

Check out this really interesting video. NASA’s Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) was able to capture video footage of a solar eruption from our sun. According to the data that was received by IRIS, the eruption was about eight times taller and five times wider than the Earth while traveling at about one and a half million miles per hour! What’s more amazing is how the footage was captured. According to NASA, IRIS must focus on different areas of activity on the sun an entire day in advance in order to capture an event like this one. Needless to say this was not a simple task. The official term for the eruption is a coronal mass ejection (CME). Thanks to some sound scientific predictions, IRIS was able to capture its first ever footage of a CME in action. Enjoy the clip!